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make your own: chia overnight oats

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Are you ready?

This might be the simplest, fastest, most satisfying breakfast you’ll ever eat.

I’ve fallen off the chia pudding train the last couple of months because for me it’s more of a comforting cold weather meal. A meal for times when you wake up at 7am and don’t leave your bed for an hour because it’s so warm in the blankets and so cold out of them so why would you? And then you hop in for a quick shower, throw on a sweater and run out the door without time for egg scrambling or smoothie blending.

ENTER: CHIA OVERNIGHT OATS.

You made them the night before in a mere FIVE MINUTES and by some magic they’re perfectly set and ready to eat straight from the mason jar you made it in by morning.

I love this breakfast because it covers all your bases: protein and fibre with the chia seeds (you can add some ground flax if you’re an overachiever in the fibre department like I am), healthy mood-boosting fats and protein like nut butter, and satiating carbs from the oats. You’ll be full, get in your morning BM, and feel energized through your morning like the rockstar you are.

CHIA OVERNIGHT OATS

INGREDIENTS:

½ cup almond milk (store bought or homemade)

½ cup rolled oats

1 tbsp chia seeds

1-1000 tbsp nut butter of choice (I go almond or peanut)

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp honey

Optional last minute stir-ins:

Cocoa nibs

Fruit

Coconut

Nuts and seeds

Spirulina powder

DIRECTIONS:

Put all ingredients in a 500ml mason jar, stir well, twist on the lid and leave in the fridge overnight.

Wake up, add any last minute stir-ins, and head out into the world with your mason jar and spoon in hand like:

HELLO WORLD, I’M READY FOR YOU.


Michelle is an RMMTT student and Holistic Nutritionist (CNP) with a focus on digestive health and learning to love the body you're in through intuitive eating and self love over dieting, always. 

Michelle currently sees clients at Inland Island Wellness Centre. Contact her for more info on her practice or to book an appointment.
// 
movewithguts@gmail.com
// @movewithguts

make your own: sauerkraut by michelle cordeiro, cnp

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I'm all about the DIY, especially when it comes to fermented foods that are normally crazy expensive to buy, but crazy delicious to eat. 

We've talked kombucha on this blog before, and if you're interested in making your own check out that post here. But maybe kombucha isn't your thing or you're looking to branch out? Great! Because the feel-good bacteria don't stop there, and can be found in the best sandwich, salad or breakfast topper ever: sauerkraut. 

Not only is homemade sauerkraut much less expensive than store-bought, but in many cases it's also much healthier to eat. 

An easy rule of thumb is to never buy the sauerkraut you find on the shelf if you're looking for the gut-healing benefits. The ones on the shelf are often pasteurized, meaning heat is applied to allow the cabbage to stay fresher for longer. But when we pasteurize fermented foods, we're also killing off the good bacteria that is beneficial for gut health, and therefore removing the health benefits. 

The good bacteria found in properly fermented 'kraut help to keep our BM's regular, our immune system thriving and boosts our energy levels. It does this by taking up space that can otherwise by occupied by the harmful bacteria that suck nutrients away from us and create the perfect environment for illness to arise. 

To ensure you're making a safe batch, clean everything prior to use including your hands. Always try to use a mild, scent free soap to avoid any chemical contamination or contaminants from scented oils (I recommend Dr. Bronner's unscented baby soap for cleaning jars and tools). 

If you DO see mould, discard the entire batch, clean the jar really well, and start the whole process over. It's unfortunate, but it's always better to be on the safe side when fermenting! 

NORMAL SIGNS OF FERMENTATION 

1) BUBBLES: we love bubbles! They show us that there is active fermentation happening and are a sign of a healthy batch. 

2) FILM/FOAM: it's normal to get a thin film collecting at the top of the jar, or to have a collection of foam as well. 

3) VINEGAR-Y SMELL: that's the acetic acid forming, and is 100% normal and welcomed (this is also what makes kombucha smell like old gym socks...), as it is great for our digestion and keeping the ferment free of bad bacteria. 

Now let's get to it: 

WHAT YOU NEED 

1 head of cabbage (you can experiment with different kinds) 

1 tbsp. sea salt 

Mason jar 

1 fermentation weight (or something heavy that fits in the mouth of the jar) 

THE HOW-TO 

Slice the cabbage thinly by hand or using a mandoline, and place in a large bowl. Add salt and begin massaging the cabbage with your hands, until you can squeeze out enough of the cabbage juice to cover up the sliced pieces (takes about 10-15 minutes). Slowly, the cabbage will begin to soften and the juices will be pulled out by the salt. 

Once enough juice is extracted to cover, tightly pack the cabbage into your mason jar as firmly as possible. Really pack it in there! Cover completely with the extracted liquid (if there is not enough liquid to cover, you can add a bit of water as necessary). 

Use the fermentation weight, or heavy (clean!!) object to weigh down the cabbage in the jar, keeping it below the liquid. Avoid anything plastic for the weight since it could leach into the jar as the fermentation process creates organic acids that can break down plastic over time. 

Cover the jar with a cloth and secure it with an elastic band. Leave the jar for 2-3 weeks, out of direct sunlight and in an area that stays close to room temperature. 

Keep tasting your batch between the 2-3 week mark until your desired flavour is reached: 

Not strong enough? Let it sit for a few more days. 

Too vinegar-y? Reduce the fermentation time on the next batch. 

Cabbage has just started it's season here in Ontario, so go grab some fresh from the farmer's market and try it for yourself! Get creative with added spices and ingredients based off of this basic recipe and be amazed (or maybe disgusted, some combos just don't work out...) at the unique flavour this ferment can create. 

E N J O Y.


Michelle is an RMMTT student and Holistic Nutritionist (CNP) with a focus on digestive health and learning to love the body you're in through intuition and self love over dieting, always. 

Michelle currently sees clients at Inland Island Wellness Centre. Contact her for more info on her practice or to book an appointment.
// movewithguts@gmail.com
// @movewithguts
// www.movewithguts.com

your new potluck staple by michelle cordeiro, cnp

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Somewhere there's a really old issue of Reader's Digest that includes a recipe for a roasted red pepper bean salad. Somewhere. But until I can find it again, I give you this recipe that is SUPER CLOSE to that salad. My sister has been making it for years and I'm in love with it, forcing her to make it for me whenever I had the chance. But one day I realized that I was totally capable of making it myself and the recipe is really quite simple... so instead of forcing her to make it for me for the rest of my life, I just learned the recipe. Because you know, I grew up a little. And I've been rocking potlucks ever since. 

AND YOU CAN TOO! 

This salad is versatile, fresh and such a crowd pleaser. It's gluten free, nut free and can be modified to also be dairy-free by omitting the feta, making it super tolerant to any allergies or diet preferences. Like I said, it's a crowd pleaser. But if you can include the feta, include the feta. 

I love having a good bean salad option when there's a big food spread because it ensures that I'm getting a hearty serving of veg, fibre and protein in one dish. It also stores really well and honestly gets even better with age as the flavours from the dressing sink further into the ingredients. Make it a day before your next BBQ or, I don't know, your next Canada Day party (topical!) to save yourself time and ensure it's at its maximum flavour potential. Maximum flavour potential of deliciousness. 

Okay I'm done blabbing, here's the recipe, hope you love it. 

ROASTED RED PEPPER BEAN SALAD 

FOR THE SALAD: 

2 red peppers, roasted and chopped 

2 (15oz) cans of black beans 

2 cups of corn 

1/2 cup feta, crumbled 

4 green onions, chopped 

1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved 

1 avocado (cubed) for serving 

FOR THE DRESSING: 

1/2 orange, juiced 

2 tbsp olive oil 

1 garlic clove, minced 

1 chopped jalapeño (more or less to taste) 

Salt and pepper, to taste 

DIRECTIONS 

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Place red peppers on a baking sheet and roast in oven for 20 minutes. Rotate peppers and roast for another 20 minutes until peppers are charred and skins can be taken off easily. Let cool, remove stem, seeds and charred skin and then chop into bite sized pieces. 

2. Combine dressing ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Set aside. 

3. Combine chopped roasted red peppers, black beans, corn, feta, green onions and cherry tomatoes in a large bowl. Cover with dressing, stirring well and let sit in the fridge for at least 2 hours (the longer the better!). Add avocado right before serving and adjust salt and pepper as needed. 

4. E.N.J.O.Y

homemade electrolyte drink by michelle cordeiro, cnp

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We're all movers, right!? 

Whether it's yoga, pilates, running, cycling, climbing, or dog walking... we all like to get our bodies moving on a fairly regular basis. As the weather heats up (these 30 degree days are amazing but SO spicy), it becomes even more important to hydrate before, during and after wiggling and jiggling our bods. 

Beyond just good old water, it might be time to think about shifting our focus to electrolytes and getting those important nutrients back into our body. I’m not talking Gatorade... Gatorade (and other marketed sports drinks) are often full of processed sugar, artificial colours and questionable flavourings while being void of any actual nutrients. 

Instead, go for a homemade version that is less expensive and more fuelling - because each ingredient plays an important role in hydration and recovery. 

Magnesium! 

Magnesium is amazing for muscle recovery. It helps to calm restless legs and eases aches and pains. This mineral is also plays an important part in stress management by supporting our adrenals, but it gets used up quickly when our bodies do go through stress (physical or mental) - like exercise. For this reason, I ingest magnesium in some form (added to my electrolyte drink or taken on its own) daily. 

Sea salt! 

Real, proper, 100% sea salt is an incredible source of important vitamins and trace minerals, which are also depleted when we move (and sweat!). Plain table salt is stripped of these minerals, so stick to natural sea salt instead to reap all of the benefits. 

Honey! 

Raw honey is the only food on the planet that naturally doesn’t go bad... CRAZY, I KNOW! Honey is full of natural enzymes and antioxidants that help to counteract the oxidative damage that comes from exercising. Honey also contains the amino acid Tryptophan which has a relaxing effect on the body making it perfect for chillaxing. 

Here's what I do! 

ELECTROLYTE DRINK: 

* 2 cups of water 

* 1/4 cup lemon or orange juice 

* 1 tsp magnesium powder 

* 1 tsp high quality sea salt 

* 1-2 tsp raw honey 

* Ice

Dissolve the magnesium powder, sea salt and honey in 1 cup of warm water. Once dissolved, add remaining 1 cup of warm or cold water, lemon or orange juice and ice cubes (if preferred). You can also make a larger batch and keep it in the fridge for the week! 

Enjoy :)

simple stir fry is the best stir fry by michelle cordeiro, cnp

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This past weekend I went up north for a little birthday celebration with my partner. Wanting quick, easy, snack-like foods at our disposal we had evvverrryythhinngg from charcuterie board deliciousness, dips, guac, chips and (because...#health?) a bunch of veggies.

But when you barely touch said veggies (oops), and end up lugging home the cut-up remnants, void of all crunch, you grill that veg UP and turn it into a stir fry because:

1) It can be eaten within 30 minutes of deciding that's what's for dinner AND it's super inexpensive. Just cut up all the veg that’s lost its crunch in your fridge and throw it in.

2) You can make a healthy, really delicious sauce using ingredients you probably already have in your kitchen. Store bought sauces are often full of sugar and GMO soy - things that are common allergens and can cause inflammation, but are easily avoided when you make your own.

3) Cooked vegetables are often easier to digest, especially if you find yourself bloated after eating them raw. Raw veg can be tough to properly digest and breakdown causing things like bloating, gas and cramping. If this is you, lightly steaming or sautéing can do wonders!

SIDE NOTE #1: I whipped this up, ate it and didn't think to take a picture or share the recipe until THIS VERY MOMENT as I write this and my partner finishes off the last bit of leftovers... I don't think I'm meant to be a food blogger. But please enjoy the generic stir fry stock photo above; it actually looks fairly, sort of, maybe, similar.

STIR FRY

4 Servings / 30 minutes

INGREDIENTS

●      1 tbsp coconut oil

●      1 onion, chopped fine

●      2 garlic cloves, minced

●      1 tsp cumin

●      1 tsp smoked paprika

●      1 bell pepper, sliced thin

●      6 mushrooms of choice, sliced

●      1 cup chopped carrots

●      1 cup green snap peas

●      1/2 cup cherry tomatoes, halved

●      1 cup broccoli, cut into small florets

●      2 tbsp sesame seed oil

●      salt and pepper to taste

●      1/2 jalapeño (optional, but really good)

●      1/2 package brown rice noodles (or rice!)

●      hemp hearts + crushed almonds for serving

DIRECTIONS

Heat coconut oil over medium heat in a large wok. Add onions and garlic and sauté with cumin and smoked paprika until softened. Be careful not to burn the garlic (I always burn the garlic).

Add all chopped vegetables (or whatever veg you have on hand). Drizzle with the sesame seed oil and sauté for 10-15 minutes until everything starts smelling delicious and the veg is cooked to your liking. Add salt, pepper and optional jalapeño.

While the stir fry is cooking, fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Once boiling, pull the pot off the heat and add brown rice noodles. Break up noodles gently and allow to soak until soft and cooked through. Drain the water and immediately toss the noodles into the stir fry to prevent sticking. Sprinkle with hemp hearts + crushed almonds and you are good to go!

SIDE NOTE #2: My only issue with this meal was the fact that it was lower in protein. If we weren’t totally exhausted and out of groceries, I would absolutely add a better protein source. Chicken? Beef? Tempeh? Whatever you’re feeling, add it in!

 

E N J O Y !

Make your own: Almond Milk by michelle cordeiro, cnp

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One week into the 20 Day Good Body Feel Reset and I'm feeling gooood. Especially because I've found my sweet cravings have been curbed by Emily's granola recipe and a ginger turmeric almond latte I've been loving lately.

I've embarked on this challenge with my housemate who hates store bought almond milk (and I don't blame her). Although I don't necessarily hate the taste of the store bought stuff, I would always choose homemade almond milk first and foremost! Not only is it quick to make, but the ingredients are MUCH less funky and it tastes so. much. better (housemate approved!!).

SO I PROMISE once you try your first batch you'll never want to go back to the store bought variety. And you shouldn't...there's often thickening agents like carrageenan, added sugar and preservatives in the store bought stuff that you just don't need.

What I find most interressstttinnngg is that I can’t find a brand that lists the percentage of almonds in the beverage. Meaning, to keep costs low there is likely a low amount of almonds actually in your almond milk (I know, WHAT?).

Although you can make this recipe with a strainer, I would definitely recommend investing in a nut milk bag. It just makes the process much faster and more efficient; I find you get more milk out of the almonds with the bag rather than a strainer. PLUS I use my nut milk bag as a reusable bag for bulk items/produce, it's very multifunctional! Alternatively, if you already have reusable produce bags they might just work great as a nut milk bag too. Give it a go!

I also had a teacher once who  said he never actually strains the almonds out of his. So if you're not picky about a grainier milk then that's always an option too. I'm personally far too particular to just leave the almond pulp in there. But you do you!

And I mean, this kind of goes for most things, but I figure if you can make it at home, you may as well make it at home. The recipe is simple:

ALMOND MILK

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup of almonds, soaked overnight* in enough water to cover at least 2 inches above almonds
  • 4 cups of water
  • pinch of cinnamon (to taste)
  • pinch of sea salt (to taste)

*If time is an issue you can soak the almonds in boiled water for an hour to soften!

DIRECTIONS

Rinse the soaked almonds until water runs completely clear. Place almonds in blender. Add water and blend on high for 2 minutes.

Pour mixture either into a nut milk bag or strainer, and strain into a bowl until all liquid is released. The nut milk bag requires you to squeeze for a few minutes until you just can't squeeze anymore (BONUS ARM WORKOUT!). You should be left with fairly dry almond pulp.

Pour almond milk into jars (it helps to pour through a funnel, or back into the blender first for minimal spillage) and add the cinnamon and sea salt.

Shake it up before each use. It WILL separate, and this is totally normal!

TIPS AND TRICKS

Want it sweeter? Add a couple dates to the blender with the almonds and water (I find 3-4 dates is enough).

Want it creamier? Use more almonds!

Want it more economical? Use less almonds!

The almond milk can last about a week in the fridge before going sour.

Full disclosure, I once made a smoothie with soured almond milk (it was an accident!!) and maybe, sort of, really liked the taste...but I do smell check it now to make sure it hasn't gone off I SWEAR.

PS. I still haven't found the best way to use the leftover almond pulp, and it often just sits in my fridge forgotten until I find it weeks later. So any suggestions PLEASE send them my way!